The Nutrition Coach Blog London Nutritionist The Nutrition Coach offers advice on healthy living, nutrition and diet issues such as IBS, bloating, gluten intolerance and more.

Life Coaching Tips – Be Nice to Yourself!

October 9, 2009

Well, the Summer holidays are well and truly behind us – and we are starting the long march into darker Winter nights!  Remember be kind to yourselves – here are some of my top favourite ways just to say (to yourself) I deserve it!

1.    Indulge in some luxury oil for the bath and pamper yourself with a long soak.

2.    Book some time in the diary for your hair and nails and a massage!  Or find a beauty college/massage college that offers more reasonable treatments for student practice

3.    Buy a trashy book – or even not so trashy book – I love Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert – http://www.elizabethgilbert.com/eatpraylove.htm

4.    Try the Pzziz – good for a quick break during the day and great for getting you off to sleep – http://www.pzizz.com

5.    A great tip from my colleague, Hilary – buy a slow cooker. Cuisinart ones are good. Just bung in the ingredients and relax.

6.    Think about doing a detox – come on our wonderful New Year retreat.  Contact interested@thenutritioncoach.co.uk to find out more, or check our blog for the latest news - http://thenutritioncoach.co.uk/blog

http://www.thenutritioncoach.co.uk/nutrition-retreats.htm

7.    Don’t try and have a tidy house – it’s a losing battle!

8.    Live in the NOW – see “The Power of Now” by Eckhart Tolle.

9.    Breathe!

10.  Celebrate the good things in life and don’t dwell on the bad

Inspire your lunchbox – Nutrition for your family

October 9, 2009

If you are like every mum and struggle to think of what to put in to the school lunchbox – I’d like to highlight what my colleague Hilary Davies has to say on the matter..

“I’d like to focus a little more on the teenagers for this one. I used to love making lunches for my boys when they were younger. Cute little plastic boxes filled with a variety of delights that they could enjoy and share with their friends with pride. There are also many books out there about healthy food ideas for young children but very little for the older ones. Although my youngest is still slightly in that zone my others are now into the lunch break that is mass refuelling at the greatest speed possible AND without a shred of street cred lost in the process! Added to this – these older ones really should be making their own lunches (if you have a child in year 7 or above and you are still making their lunches – please stop!) so I see the parent’s job as being in the background and making sure that the best foods are available to help their choices.

Some things we can insist on and some we can let go. For me the greatest necessity is that they drink enough water through the day. How many of your older children are drinking 1.5 litres of water during their school day? I think I’ve heard every excuse under the sun from a teenager about not drinking water but the stats are undeniable. A 3%, yes, just 3% reduction in hydration = 10% loss of power and 8% loss of speed. That’s just the physical effects so translate that to the brain and we could have a bunch of dehydrated fatigued children who are unable to achieve their full concentration and performance in class let alone on the sports field. If my boys consent to drinking 1.5 litres of water during their day then frankly I don’t mind if they leave the house with a ham sandwich (wholemeal and salad of course!) and an apple.

The days of little cute boxes are well and truly over for this age group so we do have to accept that the general theme is going to be anything they can pile into a pitta, wrestle into a wrap or bung into a bap. Plus it needs to be simple – remember you can fill in the nutritional gaps with your family food so this just really needs to be ‘good enough’. So chunks of fresh chicken, fresh salad – a bag will do – you could be on the side chopping tomato and cucumber otherwise it might not appear! Sticking it all together with hummus or some fresh salsa is a good idea. Try and steer away from too much cured meat such as ham and salami. Cold pizza can be a good one as it’s not considered ‘healthy’ so street cred in tact but it can be a great excuse to pile on the veggies and maybe some salmon, peas, chopped peppers, red onion and so on. I would also recommend making double quantities as so often lunch is eaten at morning break leaving them starving by the time they leave school and heading for the chippy! Aaargh!! If there’s a second bap or wrap waiting at the bottom of their bag then the gap can be well filled.

Reassuringly fruit still seems to be sociably acceptable so do pile them with that – even if they eat it on the bus to and from school!

Also be reassured that, although we lose some control over their nutrition when they are out and about, we can absolutely make up for it when they are home and they will thank you for good, wholesome family food”

If you are worried about your family’s diet – come and see us for a DIET MOT http://www.thenutritioncoach.co.uk/services-diet-mot.htm or contact us

http://www.thenutritioncoach.co.uk/contact-the-nutrition-coach.php

Can nutrition help for headaches and migraines?

October 8, 2009

Headaches seem to have been a bit of theme for me over the last couple of weeks.  I’ve seen quite a few clients complaining about thumping headaches that are becoming far too regular a feature in their lives.

We’ve all had the occasional headache, and often even know the cause of it.  The heavy night out, working late to reach a deadline or general lack of sleep can all be triggers.  Most can be treated with painkillers, but many don’t like taking them on a regular basis.

The problem with painkillers is also the fact that although they make the pain go away, the underlying reason why the headache started in the first place may still be there.  As soon as you stop taking the painkillers, the headaches often return.

I recently saw a client who had suffered from recurring headaches for as long as he could remember.  He had got to the stage when he almost didn’t notice the milder aches, and it was only when I asked that he realised that he had a headache even as we spoke.

His food intolerance test indicated a handful of problem foods, so I asked him to eliminate those from his diet for a trial two week period.  I also gave him some extra magnesium and vitamin B3, both of which can make a big difference to the severity and frequency of headaches.

After the two week period he reported a gradual decrease in the number of headaches he was getting.  We decided to continue with the same approach for another four weeks, and this time also eliminate caffeine and increase water intake.

After two months the headaches were no longer chronic, and only seemed to appear on a more occasional basis.  He also confessed to me that those occasional bouts were mostly caused by a night out, or stress at work.

If you would like some help with recurring headaches, please get in touch and book yourself in!

New Year retreat: Detox your body and re-invent your life

October 5, 2009

Our New Year retreat is the perfect way to start 2010.  Combining nutrition and life coaching, you’re guaranteed to start the year filled with health, happiness and a new perspective on life.  It’s just over three months away now and at the amazingly affordable, all inclusive, price of 490 pounds per person.  We know that it’s often easier to plan for holidays in advance, particularly as Christmas approaches, and therefore we’re offering you the option to make payments for the retreat in four monthly instalments of 125 pounds between now and the 21st January.

The retreat is set in glorious Dorset and runs from 21st to 24th January 2010.

Find out more about our New Year detox retreat, or contact our London nutrition clinic to book a place.

Julia Alderman

Depression and nutrition

September 30, 2009

Believe it or not it is nearly October – where did the summer go? October can be a time when we feel a bit blue – summer has officially ended and the days are getting shorter. But while some of us may just feel a bit down in the dumps from time to time, for others depression can be a daily battle. World Mental Health Day, which this year is on October 10th (www.wfmh.com), was established in order to raise awareness of mental health issues.

It is now known that there is a huge link between diet and mood, and certain foods can really transform how we feel. For example, tryptophan, an amino acid found in fish, chicken, turkey, oats and eggs is converted by the body into serotonin, our ‘feel good hormone’. If you want to boost your mood include some of the tryptophan foods in your diet everyday. Keeping blood sugar levels stable and improving digestive health including eliminating any food intolerances can also be very important in improving mood.

As well as diet, our lifestyles can affect our frame of mind such as being in a job we don’t enjoy, high stress levels, or perhaps being in the wrong relationship. Our life coaching services can help you to move from where you are now in your life to where you want to be in the future.

If you’re in need of a mood boost, get in touch to make an appointment at one of our London nutrition clinics.

Kim

Fibroids and diet

September 28, 2009

In clinic I often hear of the misery that women with fibroids suffer every month, with heavy bleeding, pain and abdominal swelling or bloating, and this was true of last week.  As with many gynaecological problems, fibroids are an oestrogen sensitive condition, which means that they worsen and grow when there is excess oestrogen in the body.

Following a hormone balancing diet is a wonderful way to control excess levels of oestrogen that can otherwise encourage fibroids to grow.  As part of the diet, it is also essential to look at the liver function, as optimal liver function is needed for hormone balance.  This is because the liver is responsible for processing oestrogen and if it is not functioning efficiently then old hormones can accumulate.  Substances that can compromise liver function therefore need to be eliminated as much as possible, and gentle detox principles including avoidance of alcohol and caffeine have a powerful effect.  This can be difficult in a work hard and play hard culture, which is why we coach you through each step, making it achievable, practical and with plenty of alternatives.

Find out more about how diet can help fibroids, or contact us to make an appointment at one of our London nutrition clinics.

Julia Alderman

Nutrition coach
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